Terry A. Shirey, president and chief operating officer, Nevada State Bank, loves the rodeo.


Terry A. Shirey, president and chief operating officer, Nevada State Bank

Q: What are you reading?

A: I’m currently reading “Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson. Most of us know that Jobs was an innovator, and could be a difficult guy to work for; and the biography certainly covers a lot of that ground. But so far my biggest takeaway from this book is his intense focus on ensuring Apple’s products were of the highest quality, often to the chagrin of his board of directors and other leaders of the company. What made Apple so successful was as much about his insistence on quality as it was about creating innovative products. While my industry is much different it has caused me to reflect on how these principles could be integrated into banking and our clients’ experiences.

Q: Where do you like to take clients for dinner or lunch?

A: I really enjoy Table 34, adjacent to my office at Nevada State Bank. We usually walk over. Great food and I always see people I know. The brother-and-sister team of Wes Kendrick and Laurie Kendrick have built a great hot spot for business lunches. I recommend trying their daily special — it’s a delicious experience.

Q: Where do you work out or play your favorite sport?

A: My gym is really just the neighborhood — biking with my wife or running with my dog. I tend to stick pretty close to home in Summerlin but sometimes venture west on Charleston (Boulevard) and ride out to Blue Diamond (Road). I don’t get out as often as I like, especially in the heat of summer, but in cooler months, I enjoy spending my mornings outdoors.

Q: How do you decompress after a pressing week?

A: Spending time with family. If the kids don’t have activities we like to camp on Mount Charleston. Otherwise we’re in our backyard, grilling with family and friends and enjoying Las Vegas’ great weather. Being from Wyoming, I’m a rodeo fan and I look forward to enjoying all the elements of National Finals Rodeo in December. Family and friends often visit during that time and we enjoy watching the talented competitors, the bulls and the great entertainment.

Q: What’s the biggest challenge facing Las Vegas in the next five years?

A: We need to continue to evolve education and how we think about it. The career and technical academies are a great model for secondary education, especially for those students for whom college may not be the primary objective. The goal should be for all graduates of CCSD (Clark County School District) to be either ready for post-secondary education, or have technical skills that align with the job opportunities that exist in our current economy. We hear a lot about the education challenges we face in Southern Nevada but there are some great things happening in our C&T schools that we need to build upon.