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MoveoMedics helping diabetics

After two UNLV faculty researchers presented their idea for SmartOrtho Detect, a shoe insole that diagnoses early onset of diabetic foot complications, John Landrith and his team knew they wanted a piece of the action.

“They developed the technology, got the patent and are currently working on the prototype,” Landrith said. “Our group will license the technology from UNLV to commercialize it, fund research and get it to the market.”

Landrith said MoveoMedics specializes in the design and sale of diagnostic software and wearable medical devices.

The Landrith team’s initial product, the SmartOrtho Detect, seeks to diagnose diabetic foot complications earlier than any available device or procedure on the market.

“This allows patients to begin treatment regimens much earlier than currently possible and prevent foot amputations,” he said. “Since diabetics can’t feel the bottom of their feet, any wounds that develop heal slowly and can get infected. We want to offer the earliest detection possible to improve and prevent this situation.”

Landrith said the team developed the company name, MoveoMedics, with movement and freedom in mind.

“We wanted a name that would communicate the idea of movement and freedom but at the same time that we were there to help you heal and stay healthy as a medic would out in the field,” he said.

Landrith said SNBPC has helped his company showcase its product and provided them a platform to develop its idea.

“It gives those that don’t have easy access to capital or investors a place communicate their dream,” he said.

“It also provides valuable feedback from investors with real-world experience in many different industries, which helps entrepreneurs improve their business plan and refine their presentation skills before they start raising capital.”

According to Landrith, five years from now MoveoMedics is planning to create a prototype of their second product, SmartOrtho Protect, which will correct the problem of diabetic foot complications.

“The second product will be a follow-up product from the inventors,” he said.

“It will be an automatic correction that will adjust the foot automatically. We want to be able to detect and correct the problem.”

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